Weight Loss Reduces Risk of Prostate Cancer

December 27, 2006 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health Tips Library, Lose Weight, Prostate Cancer 

As reported by the Wall Street Journal

After tracking the weight of nearly 70,000 men between 1982 and 1992, researchers from the American Cancer Society and the Duke University Prostate Center found that men who lost more than 11 pounds had a lower risk for aggressive prostate cancer than men whose weight remained the same over a decade.

The full article is available to subscribers of the WSJ

This summary courtesy of Today’s Health Tip

Health Officials Finally Advise Washing Your Hands

December 9, 2006 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Colds, Flu, Bird Flu, Health Tips Library 

Today’s Health Tip has previously reported on the importance of washing your hands. Soap and water kills the bird flu. It is important to avoid touching your face until you wash your hands after being in contact with public facilities, after taking off or putting on your shoes, pumping gas. Think about the things you touch that have been touched by others – then wash your hands. Here is the report:

NBC 15 Online published the story that Alabama health officials are emphasizing hand-washing and vaccinations to help stop the spread of two illnesses this winter: influenza and Shigella, a bacterial infection that can cause severe diarrhea. Click Here For The Full Report

Shigella cases have been reported in 30 of the state’s 67 counties and were first seen in January this year, according to health department records.

The location of flu cases across the country has also made it an unusual year, with the season appearing to start in the Southeast, reversing the usual trend of outbreaks starting in the West and spreading East.

State epidemiologist J.P. Lofgren said the Shigella outbreak has been the worst in at least a dozen years.

Lofgren said the numbers are very likely much higher – there is an estimated 30 unreported cases for each documented case, he said.

The bacterial infection is easily passed from person to person, but its spread can be stopped with proper hand-washing. At best it causes mild diarrhea, but in severe cases it can result in bloody diarrhea leading to dehydration, hospitalization and death in rare cases, Lofgren said.

Health officials are also encouraging people to be vaccinated for the flu. There has been a low demand for the vaccine even though Alabama was the first state in the nation to report widespread cases of the disease.

The Montgomery County Health Department has seen fewer people seeking flu shots during its two-week walk-in clinic, said Pat Schloeder, nurse manager for the agency.

“We’ve given about half as many as we usually give in a two-week period,” Schloeder told the Montgomery Advertiser in a story for Friday’s editions.

Be well and prosper,
Steve Pohlit
Business Development Consulting

Steve Pohlit has more than 20 years experience running very large and medium sized companies. Steve now consults personally with clients to design and implement processes that will deliver improved business performance for the long term. Most projects are self-funding within 90 days. The client then experiences a very high return on investment. Learn more about the process of Increasing Profits by 30% or More In 90 Days or Less by visiting http://www.stevepohlit.com or you can call 727-587-7871 and speak with Steve directly.

Jet Lag

December 4, 2006 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health Tips Library, Sleep, Snoring 

(the following article was found at Bottom Line News – I highly recommend all Bottom Line publications.)

No More Jet Lag

It’s holiday season, when many people may be whisking across time zones to visit loved ones or take a vacation. However, depending on where you go, jet lag, especially for those going east — say from the US to Europe — can intrude on as many as six days of vacation or business using the common guideline — one day’s adjustment for each time zone crossed. It’s even more problematic for people beyond their mid-40s, when the body develops greater resistance to being on the “wrong” time. Because the circadian clock controls all body rhythms, when jet travel disrupts it, the traveler might suffer digestive upsets and irritability (both digestive and personality) in addition to being wide awake in the wee hours and sleepy at lunch. Treating with sleeping pills, as many travelers do, relieves sleep deprivation but not jet lag symptoms during the day. The only real cure for jet lag is resetting the body clock.

RECENT LEARNING ON RESETTING THE CLOCK

Researchers at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago have spent years studying the circadian cycle puzzle and have recently determined a method that allows travelers to avoid many of the symptoms of jet lag altogether. Their method is to reset your body clock before you set foot on the airplane. To find out more, I called Charmane Eastman, PhD, director of the Biological Rhythms Research Lab and professor of behavioral sciences at Rush, who leads this work. She explained that resetting the clock requires manipulating the two key players in the circadian cycle — light and dark. Melatonin, the hormone associated with darkness, can also help. By shifting the timing of light and sleep, travelers can reset the clock a little each day. To move forward in time zones, as is done for most eastward travel is called phase advancing… for traveling west, it is called phase delaying. While the reset takes some time and effort, it’s worth it if it ensures more enjoyment from your vacation or being more effective in your business presentation.

PHASE ADVANCING (FOR TRAVEL WEST TO EAST)

There are three key components for successful time shifting — gradually adjusting your sleep schedule, taking melatonin at the right time and getting bright light, usually from a light box, at the right time.

Melatonin: Taking melatonin is not like popping a sleeping pill… melatonin timing here is specifically to reset the body clock. Phase advancing requires taking 0.5 mg of melatonin about five hours before your natural fall asleep time. (Melatonin, especially in larger doses, makes some people sleepy so be careful about driving after taking it.)

Bright light: Ideal amount of light exposure is two to three hours either in natural sunlight or with a light box pointed so your face and eyes receive the light. Getting up intermittently during that time is okay.

With that as background, you are ready to begin phase advancing for eastbound travel. The ideal would be to follow the method for the number of days equal to the number of time zones you will cross, but even fewer days will lessen your jet lag on arrival and you’ll recover more quickly. Don’t worry if you lie awake part of the time you are in bed, said Dr. Eastman. Simply remain in a darkened room for the duration and you will help reset your body clock. Based on a bedtime of midnight and a wakeup time of 8 am here is how to accomplish phase advancing…

* Day one: Take 0.5 mg of melatonin five hours before your usual bedtime (in other words, at 7 pm) and go to bed one hour earlier, at 11 pm. Get up one hour earlier, at 7 am and immediately begin light exposure.

* Day two: Take the melatonin one hour earlier (6 pm), go to bed one hour earlier (10 pm) and get up one hour earlier than day one (6 am) and into the light.

* Days three, four and five: Adjust timing of bed, melatonin and light exposure to be one hour earlier than the day before.

PHASE DELAYING (EAST TO WEST TRAVEL)

Westbound travel, which calls for phase delaying, is much easier for the body. The reason, said Dr. Eastman, is probably because the circadian cycle is usually longer than 24 hours, stretching to as much as 25. Phase delaying, then, is also simpler. Just set your bedtime later by an hour or two sequentially every night for at least a few days and get full light exposure for a few hours before going to bed. You don’t need melatonin when phase delaying. Phase delaying is also good for eastbound travelers who are crossing seven or eight time zones — especially for night owls. It’s easier than phase advancing and, for far distances, just as beneficial. However, it is difficult to schedule if you have a job with set hours or young children.

Depending on your direction of travel, resetting the body clock can take a lot of effort. But, when you’re preparing for your once in a lifetime trip, it may be far better to have a socially awkward sleep schedule (going to bed really early or waking up really late) before you go rather than miss out on any of your time at your destination. Dr. Eastman reminded me, too, that most people don’t phase shift themselves entirely into the anticipated new time zone, whether advancing or delaying. However, according to her, shifting even a few zones makes travel substantially easier and more rewarding.

Article Courtesy of Today’s Health Tip and Steve Pohlit

Be well and prosper,
Steve Pohlit
Business Development Consulting

Steve Pohlit has more than 20 years experience running very large and medium sized companies. Steve now consults personally with clients to design and implement processes that will deliver improved business performance for the long term. Most projects are self-funding within 90 days. The client then experiences a very high return on investment. Learn more about the process of Increasing Profits by 30% or More In 90 Days or Less by visiting http://www.stevepohlit.com or you can call 727-587-7871 and speak with Steve directly.

Travelers' Virus Defense

December 3, 2006 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Colds, Flu, Bird Flu, Health Tips Library 

Courtesy of Today’s Health Tip

Researchers from the University of Virginia found that people suffering from colds left behind viruses on about one third of all objects and surfaces they touched. The items most frequently contaminated include: door handles, pens, light switches, TV remotes, clock radio, faucets and phones.

I always have a small container of Thieves Spray with me and use it in hotels. That is the easy part. Planes, airports, rental cars are all infected by people with colds and more. It is impossible to spray the world around but the number one action you can take is washing your hands. Since even that is not immediately practical when you are exposed, for example immediately following the taking off and putting on the shoes routine at airport security, I carry a small container of Melaleuca hand cleaner. If I sense direct exposure being around a sick person, I will use the Thieves spray on my hands and throat area. All the products I use are small enough for that one quart sized plastic bag you are allowed to carry on.

What is the best thing you can do to stay healthy? Well I would say keeping your immune system strong by eating well, getting the right rest and using immune strengthening supplements is the recommended program of choice. Hard to do when you are a frequent traveler but still very important and worth the effort.

Be well and prosper,
Steve Pohlit
Business Development Consulting

Steve Pohlit has more than 20 years experience running very large and medium sized companies. Steve now consults personally with clients to design and implement processes that will deliver improved business performance for the long term. Most projects are self-funding within 90 days. The client then experiences a very high return on investment. Learn more about the process of Increasing Profits by 30% or More In 90 Days or Less by visiting http://www.stevepohlit.com or you can call 727-587-7871 and speak with Steve directly.